Is Gout Weed an Effective Gout Medication?

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

Goutweed gained its name through its use as a medicinal plant to treat gout and other forms of arthritis. In fact, its name is derived from the Latin word for gout, podagra. It's also known by many other names over the world, including ground elder, bishop's weed, snow in the mountain, herb gerard and pigweed.

According to the old and revered Culpepper Complete Herbal, "Neither is it to be supposed gout-wort hath its name for nothing but upon experiment to heal the gout and sciatica; as also joint-aches, and other cold griefs. The very bearing of it about one eases the pain of the gout, and defends him that bears it from the disease."

Goutweed's ability to lower uric acid levels has not been substantially studied, but any benefit as a gout medication may lie in its properties as a diuretic. It's also believed to have sedative and anti-inflammatory properties. A homeopathic remedy for arthritis, rheumatism and sciatica is made from the flowering plant.

Goutweed is a perennial plant in the carrot family. It's native to Europe and Russia (excluding Spain) and is believed to have been brought to England as a food plant by the Romans. Monks cultivated it as a healing herb in the Middle Ages, giving it the name herb Gerard in dedication to St. Gerard, who used it to treat gout. It is still frequently found around many old ecclesiastical ruins.

Both the stalk and the leaves of goutweed have been used as a gout medicine through the ages, internally and externally. It is most commonly used as a tea, or mashed into a paste and applied to painful joints as a poultice. The young leaves are boiled and eaten as a vegetable in Sweden and Switzerland, or eaten raw in a spring salad. It is also eaten by Chinese and Tibetan monks. Later in the season, the leaves have a strong flavor that most people find unpleasant. The white root stalk is described as pungent and aromatic.

Goutweed grows about 12 to 18 inches high, with large leaves, furrowed hollow stems and numerous small white flowers. It spreads so rapidly and determinedly that it is considered to be a major garden weed. Goutweed is so invasive it is almost impossible to eradicate once the roots have taken hold.


Filed under: Gout Medications, Gout Natural Remedies.

Tags: colchicine, colcyrs, gout medication, goutweed for gout, colchicine information, gout information, gout treatment, colchicine for gout.


There are 1 comment(s). Leave your comments.

Cherries Prove an Effective Gout Medication

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout is a form of arthritis caused by elevated levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia). The excess uric acid forms painful crystals in joints, tendons and surrounding tissues, causing recurring attacks of red, tender, hot, swollen and extremely painful joints, usually the joint at the base of the big toe. Other joints such as the ankles, heels, knees, fingers and wrists can also be affected, and crystals occasionally appear in the kidneys. Fatigue and fever sometimes accompany gout attacks.

Gout is caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. Dietary factors account for about 12% of gout, especially drinking alcohol and fructose-laden drinks and eating red meat and seafood. Gout is also associated with obesity, weight gain, high blood pressure, diabetes, lead poisoning, abnormal kidney function, joint trauma and surgery. Certain medications can also contribute to gout.

Until recently, it was believed that purine rich foods like asparagus, cauliflower, mushrooms, yeast, organ meats and legumes made gout worse, but recent studies found that's not the case. Some foods are known to help alleviate gout, including berries, bananas, pineapple, leafy green vegetables, low fat dairy products, complex carbohydrates, foods high in vitamin C, chocolate, coffee and tea.

One encouraging study discovered that people with gout cut their repeated attacks almost in half just by eating 20 cherries a day. Good quality cherry extract, found in health food stores, was also an effective gout medicine. The finding reinforces years of anecdotal reports from patients who attested to the beneficial effects of cherry juice for gout.

Doctors take a three-pronged approach to treating gout, prescribing different gout medications to 1) manage pain, 2) decrease joint inflammation, and 3) reduce uric acid to avoid future flare ups. Analgesics such as acetaminophen are used to manage the pain, while the NSAID Indocin (indomethacin) is the most commonly prescribed anti inflammatory medication.

Colchicine has been the standard of treatment for the acute stage of gout since the 1800s. Colchicine for gout is taken orally to both reduce inflammation and to prevent future gouty arthritis attacks. Corticosteroids such as prednisone are powerful anti inflammatory drugs that may also be administered for acute gout.

Under excretion of uric acid by the kidneys accounts for about 90% of hyperuricemia, while overproduction of uric acid accounts for fewer than 10% of cases. Medications to lower uric acid such as Zyloprim (allopurinol) or Uloric (generic febuxostat) are prescribed after the flare up has passed to help prevent further attacks. Since it received FDA approval for the chronic management of hyperuricemia in 2009, febuxostat has been prescribed increasingly over allopurinol. Febuxostat has been shown to be more effective in shrinking uric acid deposits, and not as likely to impact on kidney function.

Thanks to the effectiveness of today's gout medications, gout treatment is considered a modern medical success story - good news for America's 5 million sufferers.


Filed under: Gout Medications, Gout Natural Remedies.

Tags: buy colcrys, colchicine, gout medications, treatment of gout, gout attacks, gout prevention, gout arthritis, colchicine information.


There are 1 comment(s). Leave your comments.

Gout Treatment and Prevention

June 28, 2011 by Lynn.

While gout is usually a chronic and progressive disease, there are effective gout treatments. Gout treatment is two-pronged, concentrating first on relieving the pain and inflammation of an attack, and then on preventing future attacks and accompanying complications.

Painkillers, anti-inflammatories and corticosteroids target the pain and inflammation, while uric acid blockers or reducers are prescribed as preventatives. A prescription gout medication called colchicine can treat gout in two different ways, at higher doses to treat the pain and inflammation of an acute attack, or at lower doses to prevent recurring attacks.

Some general advice:

The first line of defense is to take a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as naproxen (Aleve), ibuprofen (Advil), indometacin (Indocin), or the newer celecoxib (Celebrex). These will ease most gout attacks in a day or two. If you have asthma, heart failure, high blood pressure or kidney problems, talk to your doctor before taking anti-inflammatories.

If anti-inflammatories don't work well enough, or you are unable to take them, your doctor will likely prescribe colchicine (Colcrys). Colchicine is an extract from a plant called the autumn crocus, also known as meadow saffron. While the persistent use of colchicine can reduce the attacks of gout, it does not prevent the accumulation of uric acid that can lead to joint damage even without attacks of hot, swollen joints.

Colchicine has been widely used in many countries since the 1930's, and was FDA approved in combination with probenicid (a gout medication which increases uric acid excretion) in the early 1980's. Colchicine was approved as a solitary gout treatment in 2009 under the brand name Colcrys.

Oral corticosteroids such as prednisone are also used to treat gout. Corticoseroids can also be injected directly into the affected joint to rapidly reduce inflammation and relieve pain. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed short-term because of potential side effects if used for a long time.

Allopurinal may be prescribed for chronic gout. Allopurinal is used to prevent, but not treat, gout attacks. It works by lowering the level of uric acid in the blood. Allopurinal must be taken daily, and may take 2 to 3 months to become effective.

It's important not to take allopurinal during a gout attack, but to wait until it has subsided. That's because it may cause an initial increase in uric acid levels, precipitating or worsening a gout attack.

Probenecid is another uric acid lowering medication that is sometimes prescribed in addition to low dose colchicine. Probenecid helps eliminate excess uric acid through the kidneys into the urine. It's important to drink lots of water when taking probenecid to prevent the formation of kidney stones. Some medications should not be taken along with probenecid, so make sure your doctor is aware of any other drugs you are taking.

Febuxostat is a newer preventative gout medication marketed as Uloric. It was developed specifically to treat gout by decreasing the body's formation of uric acid. It is suitable for patients with impaired kidney function.


Filed under: Gout Treatment and Prevention, Gout Medications.

Tags: gout treatment, colchicine, gout medication, colchicine for gout, gout prevention, buy colchicine, colchicine information, colchicine canada.


There are 1 comment(s). Leave your comments.

Anticipated New Gout Medication Unlikely to Win FDA Approval

June 29, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout sufferers awaiting the approval of Novartis' highly anticipated new gout medication Ilaris are likely in for disappointment. An FDA Advisory Committee recommended against approving the gout medication this week, citing concerns about the shortness of the clinical trials (12 weeks) and unanswered questions about possible long-term side effects.

Ilaris (generic name canakinumab) is an injectable anti-inflammatory drug currently approved to treat a rare inflammatory disorder. Ilaris injections exceeded researchers' expectations as a gouty arthritis pain reliever in two clinical trials, relieving pain more than an existing gout drug, the corticosteroid triamcinolone, and reducing the occurrence of flare ups.

"Our findings indicate that canakinumab 150 mg provides rapid and sustained pain relief in patients with acute gouty arthritis, and significantly reduces the risk of recurrent flares compared with triamcinolone acttonide," Swiss researchers enthused in a 2010 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism after conducting Novartis supported research.

But the anti-inflammatory gout medication was also linked to twice as many potentially serious side effects than triamcinolone (7% compared to 3%). As well, serious infections developed in two study participants taking Ilaris, versus no infections in the group taking the older anti-inflammatory. The gout drug also elevated levels of uric acid and some forms of cholesterol. Ilaris was not tested in older patients or in people with renal failure.

The panel was not satisfied that the benefits of the proposed gout medication outweighed the risks. As Ilaris suppresses the immune system, the panel worried about the risk of infection in patients using it long term. Their decision was complicated by the fact that the effects of a single injection are long-lasting, making them more difficult to measure.

The FDA is not bound by panel recommendations, but usually makes their final decisions based on them. Nobody will be more disappointed than Novartis should the new gout medicine fail to win approval, as they have been anticipating huge sales from both gout and rheumatoid arthritis sufferers. Novartis estimated that 300,000 gout sufferers alone might make the switch from their current gout medications.

The manufacturer will now likely have to satisfy the FDA that the gout drug is safe for long-term use, possibly at a lower dose. "We continue to believe in the benefits of [Ilaris] for this painful and debilitating disease, and will work closely with the FDA to identify the right patient population who will benefit from this therapy," Novartis wrote in a press release, adding they "remain committed to addressing the needs of people with gouty arthritis."


Filed under: Gout Medications.

Tags: gout medication, gout prescription drugs, colchicine colcyrs, colchicine fda, colchicine information, colchicine canada.


There are 1 comment(s). Leave your comments.

What you Need to Know About Gout Medication

June 30, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout is one of the most painful types of arthritis, and can disfigure and damage joints if left untreated. Gout medication falls into two categories - drugs to relieve the pain and inflammation of an attack, and preventive gout medicine to ward off future attacks and avoid complications. Here's what you need to know to make sure you are taking the right medications for your gout:

1) Pain Relievers and Anti-inflammatories

Painkillers, anti-inflammatories and corticosteroids target the pain and inflammation of an acute gout attack. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as naproxen (Aleve), ibuprofen (Advil), indometacin (Indocin), or the newer celecoxib (Celebrex) will ease most gout flare ups in a day or two.

Aspirin should be avoided if you have gout. If you have asthma, heart failure, high blood pressure or kidney problems, talk to your doctor before taking anti-inflammatories.

Oral corticosteroids such as prednisone are very effective in rapidly reducing inflammation and relieving gout pain. Corticosteroids can also be injected directly into the affected joint. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed short-term because of the potential side effects of using it for long periods of time.

If anti-inflammatories don't work well enough, or you are unable to take them, your doctor will likely prescribe colchicine (Colcrys). Colchicine is an extract from a plant called the autumn crocus, also known as meadow saffron. Colchicine has been widely used in many countries since the 1930's, and was FDA approved in combination with probenicid (a gout medication which increases uric acid excretion) in the early 1980's. Colchicine was approved as a solitary gout treatment in 2009 under the brand name Colcrys.

Colchicine can treat gout in two different ways, at higher doses to treat the pain and inflammation of an acute attack, or at lower doses to prevent recurring attacks. While colchicine can reduce the attacks of gout, it does not prevent the accumulation of uric acid that can lead to gout attacks and joint damage.

2) Preventive Gout Medication

Drugs to combat high levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia) work in one of two ways - they either decrease uric acid production, or increase the rate that uric acid is excreted through the kidneys. Uric acid blockers or reducers are prescribed as preventative gout medications, and are not for use during gout attacks. Once prescribed, the patient is usually advised to stay on them for life.

The decision on whether or not to prescribe urate lowering drugs is usually based on:

It's important not to take a uric acid blocker or reducer during a gout attack, but to wait until it has subsided. That's because they may cause an initial increase in uric acid levels, precipitating or worsening a gout attack. Some doctors also prescribe NSAIDs or colchicine for gout when introducing antihyperuricemic drugs to minimize the risk of inducing an acute attack.

Allopurinalis frequently prescribed for chronic gout. Allopurinal is used to prevent, but not treat, gout attacks. It works by decreasing urate production. Allopurinal must be taken daily, and may take 2 to 3 months to become effective. Allopurinol can cause hypertension in some patients, so blood pressure should be monitored.

Probenecid is another uric acid lowering gout medicine that is sometimes prescribed in addition to low dose colchicine. Probenecid helps eliminate excess uric acid through the kidneys into the urine. It's important to drink lots of water when taking probenecid to prevent the formation of kidney stones. Some medications should not be taken along with probenecid, so make sure your doctor is aware of any other drugs you are taking.

Febuxostat is a newer preventative gout medication marketed as Uloric. It was developed specifically to treat gout by decreasing the body's formation of uric acid. It is suitable for patients with impaired kidney function.


Filed under: Gout Medications, What is Gout.

Tags: colchicine, colchicine information, gout medications, gout pain relief, colchicine canada, colchicine.ca .


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

Apple Cider Vinegar as a Gout Medication

July 6, 2011 by Lynn.

According to folklore and other informal sources, apple cider vinegar is a good home remedy for gout. It can be used both externally and internally as a gout medication and pain reliever. The vinegar must be organic and non-pasteurized so it still has the "mother" (cloudy looking naturally occurring enzymes) in it, and is usually mixed with honey to make it more palatable.

To use vinegar externally to reduce gout pain, simply soak a cloth in vinegar and apply it to the affected area (likely the big toe) for at least 15 minutes. Or soak the sore joint in a mixture of 1 cup vinegar and 3 cups of water.

>CLICK HERE< for an apple cider vinegar gout remedy recipe and other alternative gout treatments from GoutAware.com.


Filed under: Gout Medications, Gout Natural Remedies.

Tags: gout medication, remedy for gout, natural gout remedies, alternative gout treatments, gout pain relief, colchicine.ca.


There are 1 comment(s). Leave your comments.

Age Old Resin Proves a Natural Arthritis and Gout Medication

August 10, 2011 by Alex.

An age old substance could offer new hope for sufferers of inflammatory arthritis and the more common osteoarthritis. That substance is frankincense, a resin derived from the hardy Boswellia tree. Frankincense has been traded for over 5000 years, and is best known for its aroma. It is commonly used in incense and perfumes.

Frankincense is also widely used in various religious rites, and was said to be among the gifts presented to baby Jesus by the biblical Magi, or wise men, along with gold and myrrh (a similar reddish resin). Frankincense is still burned in the Roman Catholic Church.

Frankincense has also long been valued for its medicinal properties. The resin is edible, and is used in Asian traditional medicine to aid digestion and promote healthy skin. Frankincense has also been used in Ayurvedic (traditional Indian) medicine for hundreds of years, and is called dhoop. Dhoop is used for treating arthritis, healing wounds, strengthening the female hormonal system and combating germs and mosquitoes.

Scientists have been investigating frankincense as a treatment for chronic inflammatory conditions such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, asthma, cancer, and rheumatoid and osteoarthritis In 2008, researchers from John Hopkins University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem reported that frankincense smoke was a psychoactive drug that relieved depression and anxiety in mice.

In another 2008 study at the University of California, 70 osteoarthritis patients taking a frankincense extract showed a significant improvement in their condition in less than seven days, with no major adverse effects. The extract was a proprietary product developed by Laila Nutraceuticals.

Recently, scientists from Cardiff University in Wales, noting that frankincense was a traditional herbal remedy for arthritis in the local Somali community, began to research it in the lab. Their research focused on whether and how extracts of frankincense could help reduce arthritic inflammation and reduce pain.

They were able to demonstrate that an extract of a rare frankincense species, Boswellia frereana, inhibited the production of key inflammatory molecules, helping to prevent the painful breakdown of cartilage that is characteristic of arthritis and gouty arthritis.

"What our research has managed to achieve is to use innovative chemical extraction techniques to determine the active ingredient in frankincense," explained Dr. Ahmed Ali, "Having done this, we are now able to further characterize the chemical entity and compare its success against other anti-inflammatory drugs used for treating the condition."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), arthritis is the most common form of disability in the US, impacting nearly 21 million adults. Arthritis can be classified as either inflammatory or non-inflammatory. Inflammatory arthritis is characterized by the presence of inflammatory white blood cells in the joint fluid.

Gout is an inflammatory form of arthritis, as is rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is a non-inflammatory form of the disease. Both forms are incurable, but can be managed with lifestyle changes and arthritis or gout medications. Check out the Colchicine video online.


Filed under: Gout Medications, Gout Natural Remedies, Gout Videos.

Tags: gout treatment, gout medication, gouty arthritis, anti-inflammatory drugs, buy colchicine, colchicine from Canada.


There are 1 comment(s). Leave your comments.

Experimental Gout Medication Outperforms Allopurinal

August 15, 2011 by Alex.

Spanish researchers have presented exciting findings to the 2011 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Congress. An investigational gout medication, lesinurad, was able to achieve rapid and sustained reductions in urate levels in gout patients who did not receive the desired results with commonly used uric acid lowering medications.

"Lesinurad, a URAT1 inhibitor that increases the urinary excretion of uric acid, is a potential treatment option for patients with gout," said Dr. Fernando Perez-Ruiz, one of the Spanish researchers from the Hospital de Cruces, Baracaldo in Vizcaya.

Lenisurad has shown significant urate lowering activity both used alone and in combination with either prescription allopurinal (name brand Zyloprim) or febuxostat (Uloric). The Spanish study involved 208 gout patients who had high blood urate levels for at least 6 months, even while taking the gout drug allopurinol. Patients continued on allopurinol and were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or lesinurad at doses of 200 mg, 400 mg, or 600 mg for four weeks.

All three groups who were given lesinurad showed significantly lower uric acid levels at the end of the month. The percentage of patients who achieved the target for uric acid levels after treatment was 28% in the placebo group, 71% in the 200 mg group, 76% in the 400 mg group, and 87% in the 600 mg group.

After the initial 4 weeks of treatment, 115 patients entered an extension phase in which most of them continued treatment with 200 mg of lesinurad. At week 28, 83% of the first 30 assessable patients were at target serum urate levels, with no serious adverse effects.

It's assumed that this lowering of uric acid levels will have a significant impact on the dissolving and reabsorption of gout tophi (deposits of crystallized uric acid) in the body.

New gout medications are few and far between, although there are currently at least eight gout drugs "in the pipeline". The first new gout drug to be approved in 40 years was febuxostat name brand Uloric) in 2009. In 2010 the FDA approved Krystexxa, an intravenous medication for chronic, severe gout that did not respond to other treatments.

The lesinurad mechanism of action is different than that of allopurinol and febuxostat. Both allopurinol and febuxostat are xanthine oxydase inhibitors which decrease the production of uric acid. Lesinurad is a uricosuric drug which increases elimination of uric acid through the kidneys.

Initial studies show that lesinurad may have significant advantages over another existing uricosuric drug, probenecid (Benemid), including less interaction with other drugs and more effectiveness in patients taking diuretics. This added benefit is because lesinurad is also active against another important regulator of urate secretion, OAT4. OAT4 is thought to be responsible for the high uric acid levels in gouty arthritis patients whose condition is caused or worsened by diuretics.


Filed under: Gout Medications.

Tags: colchicine, colcrys, gout medication, gout drug, prescription allopurinal, gout drug allopurinal, name brand Uloric, gout medications, lesinurad mechanism of action, gout drugs, gouty arthritis, colch.


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

Gout Medication Krystexxa Given Intravenously

August 19, 2011 by Alex.

In 2010, the FDA approved the first and only gout medication to treat adults with chronic and severe gouty arthritis that didn't respond to existing gout drugs. The intravenous medication, Krystexxa (pegloticase), is derived from an animal hormone. The pegloticase mechanism of action is different than that of other gout medications - it converts uric acid to a nontoxic byproduct that is easily excreted in the urine.

Krystexxa is given as an intravenous infusion over at least two hours every two weeks. The FDA has warned that patients should be given a corticosteroid and antihistamine before infusions because of a high risk of allergic reaction. Other common side effects of Krystexxa are gout flare ups, nausea and vomiting, chest pain, constipation, nasal irritation and bruising at the injection site.

Despite these Krystexxa side effects, the FDA believes pegloticase is an important option for the 3% of gout patients that don't benefit from other gout medications such as prescription colchicine, allopurinol and febuxostat. Approximately 3 million Americans suffer from gouty arthritis.

Krystexxa was not studied in patients with congestive heart failure, and the FDA advises it should be used with caution in patients with the condition. Krystexxa is manufactured by Savient Pharmaceuticals, an American company based in New Jersey. For more information on the gout medication, visit krystexxa.com.


Filed under: Gout Medications.

Tags: colchicine, gout medication, krystexxa, pegloticase, gout drug, krystexxa side effects, prescription colchicine, gouty arthritis .


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

New Gout Drug Krystexxa Exceeds Target

September 2, 2011 by Alex.

Gout foot
Gout foot
There is increased hope for the roughly 3% of chronic, severe gout sufferers who do not respond to current gout medications. In recent phase III trials of the new gout medication Krystexxa, an impressive 42% of refractory gout patients achieved statistically significant reductions in uric acid levels, and sustained them for six months. This exceeeded the target amount set for the study by the drug's manufacturer, Savient Pharmaceuticals. In contrast, those gout patients in the trial that received a placebo saw no reduction in uric acid levels.

"When you have seriously ill people who have no options, 40 percent is pretty good," said Dr. Michael Becker from the University of Chicago," author of the latest study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. "Gout can be a really serious and disabling disease."

Krystexxa (generic name plegloticase) was FDA approved in 2010 based on earlier clinical trials. The new gout medication, which is administered by intravenous infusion, is derived from an animal hormone. The pegloticase mechanism of action is different than that of other gout drugs - it converts uric acid to a nontoxic byproduct that is easily excreted in the urine.

High levels of uric acid are the cause of gout, an extremely painful form of arthritis. The excess acid crystallizes into needle sharp deposits in the joints, usually at the base of the big toe. The uric acid can also form knobby, chalky lumps called tophi. Tophi can be reabsorbed back into the body if uric acid levels are reduced. Forty percent of the trial participants with tophi experienced a resolution of one or more of the lumpy deposits.

Krystexxa is given intravenously over at least two hours every two weeks. The FDA has warned that patients should be given a corticosteroid and antihistamine before infusions because of a high risk of allergic reaction. Other common side effects of Krystexxa are gout flare ups (which occurred in 80% of the recent trial participants), nausea and vomiting, chest pain, constipation, nasal irritation and bruising at the injection site.

Krystexxa is not intended for use in the average gouty arthritis patient, most of which can be treated with more traditional gout medications such as Colcrys (generic colchicine) or Zyloprim (generic allopurinal). Currently, the new injectable gout drug costs about $5000 a month. It's hoped that gout patients who respond well to the treatment could eventually use cheaper gout medications.

Armed with these impressive new results, Savient Pharmaceuticals plans to amp up promotion of its new gout drug in the US and other countries. Up to now, their marketing efforts have largely been aimed at rheumatologists, but they now plan to expand their efforts to include primary care physicians. "This really now is the foundation for our launch of phase 2 into the primary care audience," said Savient Chief Executive Officer John Johnson.

Johnson says the pharmaceutical company "expects to see some acceleration in sales" as a result of their increased target market. The company is said to be disappointed in the $1.4 million dollars in net sales the gout medication generated in the first six months after receiving FDA approval.


Filed under: Gout Medications.

Tags: gout drug, krystexxa, gout medication, generic plegloticase, gout cause, gout tophi, side effects of krystexxa, generic allopurinal, zyloprim, colchicine, colcrys.


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

Anti-Gout Drug May Decrease Risk of Colon Cancer

September 6, 2011 by Lynn.

colorectal_cancer_s1_illustartion
colorectal_cancer_s1_illustartion
Allopurinol, a relatively inexpensive gout medication that has been on the market for more than 20 years, may have some activity against colorectal adenomas, or polyps, according to two separate studies. Most colorectal cancer develops from adenomatous polyps.

A large study in Israel showed that patients using allopurinol for gout had a lower risk of colorectal cancer than a control group not taking allopurinol. A second study in Italy appeared to confirm that the gout medicine protects against colon carcinogenesis. To read the full article on ScienceDaily, CLICK HERE.<


Filed under: Cancer, Gout Medications.

Tags: anti-gout drug, gout medication, allopurinol for gout, gout medicine, allopurinol, colchicine.ca, colchicine.


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

Updated Recommended Dosages for Gout Medication

October 29, 2011 by Lynn.

Dosage from newseasons
Dosage from newseasons
Dr. Gregory Rutecki, Professor of Medicine at the University of Mobile, has posted a Q and A Update on gout and gout treatment for the medical website ConsultantLive. The doctor points out that gout treatment has changed considerably in the last decade.

Use of the "old stand-by" gout drugs allopurinal and colchicine has changed, as have target uric acid levels. The post includes updated dosage recommendations for allorpurinal (higher) and colchicine for gout (lower). Like so many of his gouty arthritis patients, he laments the drastic rise in the price of colchicine.

Dr. Rutecki also touches on the newer gout medication, Uloric (generic febuxostat), which he believes is superior to allopurinal in some cases. To read all of Dr. Rutecki's post, >Click Here.<


Filed under: Gout Medications.

Tags: gout medication, gout treatment, gout drugs, colchicine for gout, gouty arthritis, price of colchicine, generic febuxostat, buy uloric.


There are 1 comment(s). Leave your comments.

Gout Drug Colchicine Studied to Treat Pericarditis

November 1, 2011 by Alex.

by AzRedHeadedBrat
by AzRedHeadedBrat
Pericarditis is the inflammation of the pericardium, a fibrous sac that surrounds the heart. It commonly occurs for no known reason, but can also be caused by tuberculosis, cancer, cardiac surgery, viral infections, or an autoimmune disease. Pericarditis is usually painful, and can cause life-threatening fluid accumulation around the heart.

Pericarditis can be treated with anti-inflammatory drugs (such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or a steroid), but recurrences are frequent - occurring in about 50% of patients after their first attack, and one third of patients with acute pericarditis. Some patients have been treated with another drug, colchicine, although there is little data from clinical trials on its effectiveness.

Researchers form Italy's Maria Vittoria Hospital conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study to see whether colchicine can help resolve the symptoms and prevent further recurrences of pericarditis. The results were published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

One-hundred-and-twenty patients who had a first occurrence of pericarditis were randomly assigned to receive either generic colchicine or a placebo pill every day for six months. Both groups also received anti-inflammatory drugs. The researchers found that symptoms of pericarditis improved within one week more often for patients who received colchicine than for those who received a placebo.

Patients who received colchicine also had about half the number of additional episodes of pericarditis during the following eighteen months than those who received the placebo. Gastrointestinal symptoms (such as diarrhea, nausea, or discomfort) were the most frequent side effects, occurring in seven percent of the patients in both groups.

It is also not yet known how long treatment with colchicine should be continued. Patients whose pericarditis was caused by specific infections or cancer, pregnant or breastfeeding women, and patients who had already had more than one incidence of pericarditis were not included in the study, so it's not known whether colchicine would be beneficial or safe for those patients.

Colchicine is not approved for the treatment of pericarditis in the United States or Europe, and this use is considered off-label. But the researchers say the implications of their study are that colchicine is a safe and effective treatment for some patients who have had their first occurrence of pericarditis.

Colchicine has been used as a gout medication since the 1800s, and an estimated three million Americans rely on the gout drug to ease the intense pain of gouty arthritis. The price of colchicine soared in the US in 2010, when URL Pharma was given market exclusivity for their name brand Colcrys, and generic colchicine was ordered off the market.

Generic colchicine is still available in Canada, and American gouty arthritis sufferers can still buy colchicine at a reasonable price through an online pharmacy with a valid prescription.


Filed under: Recurrent Pericarditis, Gout Medications.

Tags: treat gout, gout drug, gouty arthritis, generic colchicine, gout medication, price of colchicine, name brand Colcrys, buy colchicine, www.colchicine.ca.


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

Arcalyst for Gout under Review by FDA

November 29, 2011 by Estella .

from Regeneron Pharm
from Regeneron Pharm
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced that FDA will review its drug Arcalyst as a treatment for gout. FDA plans to complete this review by July 30, 2012.

Arcalyst (rilonacept) is currently approved to treat Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS), a rare genetic anti-inflammatory disease. Regeneron reported $5.5 million in sales of the drug during the third quarter.

Regeneron is a fully integrated biopharmaceutical company markets two main products: Arcalyst (rilonacept) injection for subcutaneous use and Zaltrap (aflibercep) injection. Additional information about Regeneron and recent news releases are available at www.regeneron.com.


Filed under: Gout Treatment and Prevention, Gout Medications.

Tags: arcalyst, rilonacep, fda review, gout treatment, gouty arthritis, new gout drug.


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

Recall of Allopurinol Tablets made by Teva

January 16, 2012 by Estella.

from HK2046
from HK2046
Hong Kong's Department of Health today instructed the wholesale drug dealer to recall a batch of Allopurinol tablets.

Allopurinol (under brand name: Zyloprim) is a drug used to treat hyperuricemia and multiple recurrent gout attacks.

According to the investigation, no fungal elements and the black substances were found in the tablets. Hydrocarbon oil might be used in equipment for the production of tablet. It may cause the quality issues.

Almost 23-thousand boxes has been imported into Hong Kong and were supplied o HA, local pharmacies and private doctors.

So far, A Health Department spokesman said they had not received any reports of adverse affects in connection with the product.

Colchicine tablet is another alterative gout drug for the treatment of gouty arthritis and gout attacks.


Filed under: Gout Medications, Gout Arthritis.

Tags: allopurinol, zyloprim, tablets, teva, recall, hong kong health department, gout drug, gout attacks, colchicine tablet, colchicine.ca.


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.

Colchicine and Watermelons

August 29, 2012 by Julia.

Colchicien and Watermelon
Colchicine and Watermelon
What do watermelons and colchicine have in common? They are combined to create seeded watermelons.

Colchicine, a derivative of the autumn crocus, which is also used to treat gout, is added to the watermelon seedlings before they flower. This causes the watermelon eggs to produce an incorrect amount of chromosomes, resulting in seedless watermelons. Seedless watermelons (which do not contain the hard, black seeds needs for reproduction) can not reproduce - similar to a mule. A mule is the progeny of a horse and a donkey, which is sterile.

Seedless watermelons, although they seem like an amazing new genetically modified melon, aren't genetically modified at all; they simply are reacting to the introduction of colchicine to their reproductive cycle. Read more on The Salt, NPR's food blog.

Remember to ask your doctor for a prescription for colchicine 0.6mg if you have gout. It is still one of the most natural and highly prescribed gout medications on the market today. But since there may be only one manufacturer in your area, you may be charged an exorbitant price. Shop online at an international pharmacy for more affordable colchicine.


Filed under: Cochicine 0.6 mg, Colchicine Use, Gout Medications.

Tags: colchcine 0.6mg, canadian pharmacy,.


There are no comments for now. Leave your comments.
Most Recent Posts
Category
Archives